It’s Time Washington Operates like Small Business

Do you and millions of other small-business owners care about the out-of-control public debt? Of course you do. You have to balance your budget, why doesn’t Washington have to do the same?
Budget petition

Are you fed up with watching government officials engaging in the political equivalent of an elementary school playground fist-fight, and growing more weary by the day of a perpetual stand-off that is hastening our nation’s rush towards bankruptcy.

That’s why NFIB is taking a new and different approach. We’re launching a petition to call on you – our 350,000 small-business members – to demand deficit reduction that focuses on spending cuts, not higher taxes. What’s more, we’re going to demand a balanced budget amendment to the U.S. Constitution and a comprehensive plan for reducing our national debt.

I urge you to visit www.nfib.com/balance immediately and add your voice to this important petition. NFIB will make sure that every office on Capitol Hill, the president and all key policymakers receive this plea for responsible fiscal action. By adding your name to our petition, you are joining a growing list of your fellow small-business owners who want Congress to end the gridlock and put America’s needs ahead of politics.

Your signature will also add momentum to our long-standing fight for ending wasteful federal spending. With your help, NFIB can focus greater attention on those who don’t care whether our public debt just keeps on growing without any solution.

Yes, something must be done, and done now. You can be part of this new and different way to demonstrate to lawmakers that small-business entrepreneurship can be a successful model to managing the federal budget if applied responsibly—a model that means building a pro-growth fiscal policy, which includes tax and entitlement reform.

No amount of political posturing will cure the disease that is eating away at America’s fundamental financial structure. Small-business owners must stand firm and demand responsible fiscal leadership or the debt-can will just be kicked even further down the road.

Sign the Balanced the Budget petition now.

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About Dan Danner

Donald A. "Dan" Danner was named president and CEO of the National Federation of Independent Business, the nation's leading small business association, in February, 2009. Danner is only the sixth president in the history of the organization. Before rising to the top spot, Danner was executive vice president, overseeing NFIB's federal and state public policy and political activities as well as the organization's three 501 (c) 3 operations: the Research Foundation, Small Business Legal Center and the Young Entrepreneur Foundation. He came to NFIB in 1993 as vice president of the NFIB Education Foundation (now known as the Young Entrepreneur Foundation) and was named vice president of federal public policy in 1995. Previously, he was chief of staff to the U.S. Secretary of Commerce. Danner also worked in the White House Office of Public Liaison, where he was special assistant to the president and deputy director of the department. Before joining the White House staff, Danner was an executive with Armco Inc., a steel manufacturing company. He held leadership positions in sales and marketing, as well as state and federal lobbying on issues such as energy, environment, taxes and trade. He also served four years as vice president of federal relations at George Mason University. A native of Middletown, Ohio, Danner holds an MBA degree from Xavier University and an electrical engineering degree from Purdue University.
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One Response to It’s Time Washington Operates like Small Business

  1. Pingback: Small-Business Owners Do It, Why Can’t Washington? |

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